Shifting Focus

After returning to campus, I quickly found I needed to change the direction of my project. This change was prompted by a new data set related to my project had been found while I had been away. I am focused on a protein known as Huntingtin’s protein (Htt) that, when mutated, aggregates and caused Huntington’s disease. One of the harmful effects of this protein is the alteration of transcriptional regulation, which was shown in this new data set. The data includes specific genes which are affected by mutated Htt. Furthermore, it shows how a protein of previous interest, Slx5, reverses this effects.

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How Has US Foreign Aid Changed?

In my first post, I outlined my research goals for this summer. I began my research with the intent of investigating the geopolitical purposes of US foreign aid in the post-9/11 era. However, I soon learned that foreign aid cannot be understood only through one historical lens, but rather as a tool with constantly changing motives and outcomes. These motives match the international political climate and shift with state priorities. Depending on the motives of foreign aid, the outcomes range widely.

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Update 1 – The effectiveness and access of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder treatments

In an effort to better understand and critique the current effectiveness and access of treatments for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), I first focused my research on what exactly this disorder entails. I broke the topic into smaller categories, reviewing scientific journals to learn about the many factors and components of HIV-associated dementia.

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Narrowing My Focus and Moving Forward with Virginia Woolf

     Research, as I have often been told and am now experiencing, is a process. Part of that process is narrowing the focus of one’s research question in order to more properly convey the information one has learned and the implications one draws from said information. In my previous blog post, I discussed my plan to investigate symbols of unattainable goals as they relate to the solitary, individual self in the works of Woolf and Beckett. However, in order to further narrow my research topic, I have decided to cut Samuel Beckett’s work from my research. Instead, I will focus only on Virginia Woolf.

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