Slow Food in a Fast Food World: American Collegiate Chapters’ Approaches to Food Production Issues (Update 2)

After several days of intense reading, I have now explored two of my three topics in depth and created a rough outline for these two sections of my paper. While in many cases the situation was more serious than I expected, it is wonderful to know that there are organizations actively working to alleviate the problem.

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Slow Food in a Fast Food World: American Collegiate Chapters’ Approaches to Food Production Issues (Update 1)

My project can be divided into roughly four stages. Beginning in January, I contacted all collegiate Slow Food chapters who had contact information listed, asked for interviews, received appropriate paperwork, and set up appointments. This phase took far more patience than expected: of the twelve chapters I contacted, I received responses from six groups, and only three have led to interviews so far. This situation does not entirely adversely affect my project, as my research focuses on active Slow Food chapters. Moreover, the chapters that participated organize a large variety of events and discuss many different topics.

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Fort Wilson Riot: First Update

After completing my first round of research I have been able to refine my research topic a great deal and have also gained new respect for conducting historical research. My original guiding questions were “What drove the radical militia to assault Fort Wilson?, What exactly occurred during the skirmish? How was the conflict remediated and resolved after the fighting? and , What can the resolution of this specific conflict tell us about the broader resolution of conservative-radical debates and the construction of the American Revolution’s meaning?”. I have retained the original three questions but have tweaked the final question. Rather than focusing on the narrow topic of conservative-radical debates, I have shifted my interpretation of Fort Wilson to focus on what is arguably the most important and longest lasting element of the Revolution: the creation of a republican political culture.

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Form and Numbers: Culminating Information on Medieval Music

Entering my third week of research, I have been conducting structural analyses of 4 separate pieces written during the Ars nova in order to be able to view the layouts of isorhythm and retrograde motion in a detailed, yet still concise, way. The 4 pieces are listed below: [Read more…]

Shifting Focus

After returning to campus, I quickly found I needed to change the direction of my project. This change was prompted by a new data set related to my project had been found while I had been away. I am focused on a protein known as Huntingtin’s protein (Htt) that, when mutated, aggregates and caused Huntington’s disease. One of the harmful effects of this protein is the alteration of transcriptional regulation, which was shown in this new data set. The data includes specific genes which are affected by mutated Htt. Furthermore, it shows how a protein of previous interest, Slx5, reverses this effects.

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How Has US Foreign Aid Changed?

In my first post, I outlined my research goals for this summer. I began my research with the intent of investigating the geopolitical purposes of US foreign aid in the post-9/11 era. However, I soon learned that foreign aid cannot be understood only through one historical lens, but rather as a tool with constantly changing motives and outcomes. These motives match the international political climate and shift with state priorities. Depending on the motives of foreign aid, the outcomes range widely.

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Update 1 – The effectiveness and access of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder treatments

In an effort to better understand and critique the current effectiveness and access of treatments for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), I first focused my research on what exactly this disorder entails. I broke the topic into smaller categories, reviewing scientific journals to learn about the many factors and components of HIV-associated dementia.

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Narrowing My Focus and Moving Forward with Virginia Woolf

     Research, as I have often been told and am now experiencing, is a process. Part of that process is narrowing the focus of one’s research question in order to more properly convey the information one has learned and the implications one draws from said information. In my previous blog post, I discussed my plan to investigate symbols of unattainable goals as they relate to the solitary, individual self in the works of Woolf and Beckett. However, in order to further narrow my research topic, I have decided to cut Samuel Beckett’s work from my research. Instead, I will focus only on Virginia Woolf.

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Native American Dance/Performance, Choreographer’s Approach: Early Progress

I have now completed between ten and fifteen hours of research, primarily in the form of reading and taking notes from established literature on the subject of dancing in Native North American tribes. While I have much reading left to do, I feel better situated to embark upon the field trips which I am in the process of planning, and which I hope will constitute the majority of my research experience. However, I had not expected that these few books would go so far towards answering at least the shallower of my initial questions; this is a humbling affirmation of the ignorance with which I began the study, and which underlies some of my original lines of inquiry. However, that I have derived useful knowledge from written literature is encouraging. Perhaps the most important idea I have found, implicitly or explicitly, in these books, is that reading scholarly publications on Native American matters is not a substitute for the real familiarity with the culture that comes from in-person interaction. At the very least, I believe I have added important vocabulary and concepts to my mental toolkit, so that a more thorough understanding of the process and performance of dance in Native North American tribes might become accessible to me.

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Gendered Nouns – Intro/Update #1

My work on this project (abstract) can be roughly divided into three categories: planning and creating the survey, running the study, and analyzing/interpreting the results. As I am close to completing the first category, it seemed like a good time for an introduction/update.

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