Summary Post

Hi everyone,

I incorporated suggestions from my advisor and am now officially done with my summer project. It has been a very rewarding experience!

[Read more…]

Post #3

Hi everyone,

After working on my paper over the past month, I finally finished it up this weekend and sent it in to my advisor. To recap, I wrote about economic studies from the past two decades that evaluated the impact of right-to-carry, shall-issue, and concealed carry gun laws on crime rates in the United States. Sadly for our country, my topic became increasingly relevant earlier this month, as two tragic mass shootings occurred a day apart from each other. In the El Paso shooting (August 3rd) and the Dayton shooting (August 4th) combined, 31 people were killed. These shootings spurred protests around the country, and many people are now reconsidering their views on gun control. Even conservative political leaders are recognizing the need to reform our nation’s gun laws and create more effective policies. Reading about these two tragedies and some of the personal stories of victims was devastating, and I’m glad there finally seems to be some national urgency for reform.

[Read more…]

Post #2

In the first stage of my research, I went one-by-one through some of the existing economic studies that statistically and empirically evaluated the effects of right-to-carry, shall-issue, and concealed handgun permit laws on crime rates in the United States over the past several decades. My main takeaway from this initial stage of research was that there is a lack of consensus among the research community on the effects that these laws have on crime in our country.

[Read more…]

Post #1: End of Research

During the initial stage of research for my project, I went chronologically through the most well-known economic literature on gun violence in the United States from the past twenty five years, beginning with the notorious “More Guns, Less Crime” book by John Lott (1998) and ending with a 2018 study that incorporated recent mass shooting statistics from the past decade. After going through many of these studies, I have found that there is great disagreement among economists about the effect of various gun laws on crime rates, with some finding that legal gun ownership deters criminals from committing most types of crime and others finding that a higher prevalence of guns generally increases violent crime, two very contradictory conclusions. 

[Read more…]