Closing comments

In Dr. Allison’s lab this summer, I worked on a team studying the transport of the thyroid hormone receptor α. Our project is ongoing, intending to explore which importins bind to TRa and characterize how they bind to the receptor. Importins are proteins that can bind to cargo in response to specific signals that direct transport into the nucleus; we wanted to study which importins bind to TRa, as well as what parts of TRα are important in transport between the nucleus and the cytoplasm.

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Entry #2: Protein Expression

Our goal this summer was to create fusion proteins of TRα and its domains for use in future experiments. We would use bacteria in order to express our protein, by utilizing the same molecular machinery that bacteria use to synthesize native proteins.

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Abstract v. 2

While due to some issues of confusion and some business at home, I am getting a late start on blogging, I’m looking forward to writing about my research this summer. While I wrote earlier that my project would focus on analyzing mitochondrial DNA of human remains, that project, unfortunately, did not pan out this summer. We ran into difficulties obtaining new samples for study. However, I was fortunate enough to work on another project in Dr. Allison’s lab for the summer.

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Abstract: Examination of Human Remains from Fontebelle, Barbados, through mtDNA Analysis

In recent years, DNA sequencing and analysis have become important tools in anthropological and archaeological research, particularly regarding the study of human populations and migration patterns. Because of its high mutation rate and simplicity of inheritance from mother to child, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is particularly useful for reconstructing the genetic lineage of both individuals and human populations. Sequencing and comparing highly mutable portions of the mitochondrial genome, called Hypervariable Regions I and II, can offer insight into the origins of individuals as well as the migration and kinship patterns of populations.

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