The Unattainable in the Works of Virginia Woolf and Samuel Beckett: Altering My Focus (Update #1)

      I am entering my third week of researching the works of Virginia Woolf and Samuel Beckett. I have read the Beckett trilogy, including the books Molloy, Malone Dies, and The Unnamable, and I have also read Woolf’s novels, The Waves, Between the Acts, and To the Lighthouse. I am currently reading Woolf’s The Voyage Out. I still need to re-read Beckett’s play Waiting for Godot, and read his novels, How It Is and Watt. Of Woolf’s work, I still need to read The Years.

[Read more…]

The New History of Disability: The Disability Poetics Movement

The Americans with Disabilities Act was signed into law in 1990.

For many, it mostly goes unnoticed. Handicap parking spaces are at worst vague nuisances to some. Entry ramps for stairwells are mostly invisible. But for the 20% of Americans who have some form of disability, this marked the first real legal victory. Comprehensive federal legal rights for Americans with disabilities are only two decades old. But in those twenty years, a marked shift of culture has occurred. Many in the disability community of all stripes have sought to reclaim disability as an identity: what it means for them and those around them, rather than what their existence means for the able-bodied.

[Read more…]

Scriblerus Club, Entry Three

After madcap hours of typing, typing, typing, and scouring the MLA Handbook for some help with properly citing poetry, I am officially done.  It feels fantastic.  I’m staring at 4500 words of literary analysis, now safely backed up to my flash drive, and I feel a profound sense of accomplishment.

[Read more…]

Scriblerus Club, Entry Two

I’ve managed to slog through all the reading and finish the first part of my project two weeks ahead of schedule.  Now I have more time to devote to the actual paper.  I thought that immersing myself in 18th century literature for a month would be boring at best – thankfully, I proved myself wrong.  While deciphering old, blotted-over fonts turned out to be tricky, the actual works held my attention.  Pope, in particular, surprised me with the material he snuck into The Dunciad.  An entire section of the work depicts a sort of Dunce Olympics, which includes shouting matches, pissing contests, and races to put men to sleep.  The fact that one man wins a footrace by sailing over the finish line on a burst of fecal matter (yes, this is 18th century British Literature, everyone, how classy) converted me into a fan.

[Read more…]