Final Summary of Immigration Research

Hello all!

To everyone who read my earlier updates, thanks for joining me on my epic quest to compare immigration narratives between U.S., Mexican, and Honduran media. To those of you who would prefer a short-cut, here’s a quick summary of my research process and findings. If you’re interested in an aesthetically-pleasing presentation that expands on my work, click this link: https://www.canva.com/design/DADjCQOqTpI/GIKViodioiczN4__5Hj-FQ/view?utm_content=DADjCQOqTpI&utm_campaign=designshare&utm_medium=link&utm_source=sharebutton

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Comparisons of Immigration Narratives B/w All Newspapers

Hello again!

If you’ve been on the edge of your seat waiting for this post to drop, I don’t blame you. It’s finally time to share some statistics that compare the immigration narratives between our receiving country of the U.S. and the origin countries of Honduras and Mexico. As Week 3 begins, I’m exiting the data-collection stage and entering the data interpretation/presentation stage, so here are some of the highlights.

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Immigration Narratives of “Origin” Countries

Hi everyone!

I’m back with some updates on the immigration narratives told by Mexican and Honduran newspapers. While both of these countries are classified as migrant “countries of origin,” the most important difference between the two is that Honduran migrants in the U.S. currently enjoy TPS (Temporary Protected Status) and Mexican migrants do not. To those of you who don’t know, TPS provides migrants with a work permit and prevents them from being detained based on immigration status. Most Honduran citizens who have continuously lived in the U.S. since January 1999 are eligible. This distinction between the two countries could affect the narratives being told to potential migrants back home.

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Immigration Narratives: First Impressions

Hello everyone!

During my first week of research, I analyzed the immigration narratives being told by the New York Times. This meant that I classified each immigration-related article as an opinion piece or a news piece, assigned it to one of five broad categories such as “Border Crossing” or “Government Policy,” and wrote down a quick summary of each story. Then, I noted whether the article carried a neutral, encouraging, or discouraging message to potential immigrants from Mexico and Central America. Each article was sourced from the time period between January 2018 and June 2019. 250 articles later, here are some of my main takeaways.

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