Mapping Media Responses to Research

My research is drawing to a close just in time for classes to start. My advisor, Professor Linneman, is helping me to formalize and flesh out a brief paper that I’ve written about my findings. In it, I describe the types of coverage that I found most commonly, which include
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Post 3: Community Based Participatory Research

As my research project comes to a close, I’d like to attempt to make some broad conclusions and tie together the concepts of health promotion and community capacity building one last time.  In previous posts I discussed the importance of using research as a link between capacity building and health promotion and examined the sociological concept of community. In this final post I would like to introduce a community based research method that unites concepts in these previous posts and in my opinion, is one of the most promising methods through which to conduct capacity building and health promotion in unison. This method is called community based participatory research, abbreviated as CBPR .

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Post 2: The Concept of Community in Health Promotion & Capacity Building

During the past month I’ve been writing, editing and rewriting my research paper, which focuses on the intersection between community capacity building and health promotion. The more I researched, it became clear that I’ve tackled a pretty huge topic that could take volumes to explain. So, I’ve decided to view my Monroe project as an introductory document that provides a simplified explanation of how health promotion and capacity building can be conducted in tandem. Cognizant of the fact that this is only a starting place for much more in depth investigations, it is important to frame my research in the right sociological context before continuing. Thus, in this post I’m going to discuss the concept of community and it’s relevance to capacity building and health promotion. I’ve used some information from people who can explain this more clearly than I, so excuse the citations.

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“Why silent types get the girl”: Misadventures in Science Journalism

Progress on my case studies was much slower than I anticipated. I ended up spending about 3-4 hours on each of the twelve cases over the past six weeks. My methods consisted of reading and taking notes on each study to ensure that I understood the research thoroughly. After this, I would perform several Google searches to seek out related articles and videos, altering my search terms each time. I took notes on about 30 articles per case.

It quickly became frustrating.

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