Final Update: Finished, but not finished; the words women use to describe themselves and others

As I conclude my project, I’ve had a hard time actually concluding it. I continue to look through the data, realizing I missed a good question, or that I should have made a certain connection. I really enjoyed this research project and I hope to do more in the future. For now, however, I will reflect. 

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Investigating the words women use to describe themselves

This summer, I will conduct research on the English words that people who identify as women use for themselves and what words they find acceptable to use, especially in relation to age. For children, the word ‘girl’, is widely acceptable, but the matter of at what age people should no longer be called ‘girls’ is a tricky one. In my experience, many teenagers and young adults do not want to be referred to as ‘girls’, but they do not necessarily feel as though ‘women’ fits them either. My idiolect of American English, and the dialects of most of my peers do not have a word that specifically describes female adolescents and young adults. The word after ‘girl’ is ‘woman’, or ‘women’, for which I feel too young. Somewhat separate from age distinction is the word ‘lady’, but the word has a negative connotation in some cases. Thus, I have returned to ‘girl’ in recent times.

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Conclusion: Nazi Propaganda Then & Now

To summarize the findings of my project, I decided to write two separate pieces; one on the techniques of Nazi propaganda and their effect on women, and another on the potential of Nazi propaganda in modern America.

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Nazi Propaganda: Acknowledging their own Evil

In my last post, I wrote about how many of the propaganda techniques that the Nazis used were frighteningly common. Since then, I have been trying to figure out why relatively basic strategies were able to convince people to follow Adolph Hitler as he killed millions of people and destroyed much of Europe.

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