Conclusion and Summary

While updating you all on my research I often left out how the actual process is going, instead choosing to update everyone about what I was learning regarding the subject matter of my paper. That being said, I wanted to make this conclusion post about what I’ve learned throughout this research project and some thoughts summarizing American populism and the direction it is heading in.

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Update #3: Writing about American Populism

Hello folks! These last couple weeks I have been finishing up the sources I gathered discussing American populism during the 20th century, today, and how it has evolved and begun writing my literature review. Something I have made sure to keep in mind while writing about these politicians and their use of populism (Huey Long, Father Coughlin, George Wallace, and Donald Trump) is the importance of providing historical context to their rise and terms as elected officials. That being said, it can be difficult to keep entire decades of political history short, but I think I have been doing a good job of presenting this information concisely.

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Gathering Data on Abortion Law History

One of the goals of this project is to try to identify consistencies in abortion market demand elasticity. Ideally, it would be most useful to be able to see commonalities in trends across different populations when similar laws are implemented. In order to be able to chart a portion of a market demand curve, different points of the same demand curve must be identified. This is harder than it sounds; when using points found by changing market equilibrium, it must be established that a certain change is solely due to a shift in supply and that the demand curve remained constant. This, then, requires a sudden shift to take place in abortion policy that effects supply in such a way that equilibrium would shift without any significant changes in demand. Elasticity could be roughly estimated from such a shift.

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Post #3 Art Therapy

Hello everyone! During my last week of research, I looked through the data/surveys I got from actual students taking an art therapy class at William and Mary. As I mentioned in my first post, these students took a survey before and after their class. The survey asks them to assess their stress, happiness, and energy levels. Because the data is over the course of one class and not multiple, I could not average the data together. Instead, I made bar graphs portraying the participants feelings before and after the class. Based on this data, art therapy is very effective. However, we must remember that my sample size is very small – only 16 people were able to take the survey. On the flip side, these findings are corroborated by most of the articles I found while researching – the common finding being that art therapy is successful. I will now try to get some statistics on how reliable my data is and work on my poster!

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